Silvia Carta

European Policy Centre (EPC)

Common European Asylum System, Migration Governance, Refugee Protection

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Main research interests

  • Common European Asylum System
  • External dimension of asylum policies and EU migration cooperation with third countries
  • International refugee law and asylum jurisprudence

Silvia Carta is a policy analyst in the European Migration and Diversity Programme at the European Policy Centre. Her main fields of work include the Common European Asylum System, the external dimension of asylum policies and EU migration cooperation with third countries, as well as international refugee law and asylum jurisprudence.

Before joining the EPC, she worked as a parliamentary assistant and policy advisor in the European Parliament. Prior to that, she gained experience in the legal team of the UNHCR Regional Representation for EU Affairs in Brussels. She also worked as a research assistant at the Odysseus Network for Legal Studies on Immigration and Asylum in Europe (Brussels) and as a legal intern at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law (Heidelberg).

She holds an LL.M. in European Union Law from the Institut d’études européennes (IEE) of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, an MA in Human Rights and Multi-Level Governance from the University of Padua, and a bachelor’s degree in International Relations and Development Cooperation from the University of Turin.

Within the framework of the MEDAM project, Silvia currently leads the analysis of policy developments in migration-related policies in the EU, as well as policies in key member states, and actively promotes MEDAM in the EU policy community based in Brussels.

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  1. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    8/ In a nutshell, in the absence of more robust policies, ad hoc responses defined the EU’s approach.

    These risk coming at the expense of more structural and systematic preparedness, while hindering efforts to foster 🇪🇺 unity on longer-term priorities & reforms.

  2. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    7/ Policy proposals that emerged to tackle crisis situations - like the proposed instrumentalisation regulation - also lead to increased fragmentation of asylum policies by providing incentives for member states to derogate from common rules. 🚧

  3. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    6/ ⚠️ Securitization dynamics have re-emerged across the board. The cases of Afghanistan and Belarus are stark examples, with strong emphasis on external border management, control measures, and a new 'instrumentalisation' rethoric.

  4. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    5/ The EU’s ability to mobilize funding and flexibly adjust to circumstances has grown over time.

    🔀Yet, there are tradeoffs to face in terms of diverting resources from longer-term commitments in the areas of EU migration, humanitarian, and development policy (👀ODA, NDICI).

  5. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    4/ On a positive note, the creation of effective EU coordination mechanisms created opportunities for member states to work together.

    🤝 Cooperation at the operational level should be leveraged to re-establish trust & encourage collaboration beyond crisis situations.

  6. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    3/ To frame our research, we focused on recent migration-related challenges in the context of 🇦🇫Afghanistan, 🇧🇾Belarus & 🇺🇦Ukraine.

    We looked at how the EU mobilised crisis preparedness and resources, and what narratives and policy responses it adopted.

  7. Avatar des Autors

    Silvia

    @CartaSilvi

    2/ Moving to the conclusions, we argue that crisis-mode decision-making and ad hocism are at odds w/ achieving structural preparedness and a more robust asylum policy framework.

    Yet, some elements in the EU crisis response were positive and should be kept in the long term.🔭